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Worship Tech conference
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Hi I am currently looking to run a conference/ training day/ equipping ect.. for technicains. I feel that with the advances in technology, it can be very scary and daunting o be involved with this side of chuch life. I have had this on my heart for sometime and feel that God wants to do something. The ideal would be to have so reps from various companys and biiger churches to give training sessions but also to have worship sessions and teaching times. with various knowledge floating around it could be that there are 2 or 3 levels of training seesions and various streams, audio, lighting, video maybe even monitors, recording, video editing ect.. I need your input. would this be somthing you would come to and if so what would you like out of it. idealy i would like to form a team who have the same vision for something like this who can help head this up, and maybe even to use worship central as a platform to help gather people. Thank you Anthony

Anthony drummer, Sound tech, lighting tech, video tech, youth leader

I think that's a great idea =] There's plenty at my church who would benefit from that, including me! Unfortunately i can't help any more than praying and giving my support! TM
Hi Anthony It's a good idea, and I think I would try to organise it regionally though. In our church, we're lucky enough to have a guy who has been a professional sound engineer, so whilst he doesn't serve on the PA team, we've got him to do some training for us, and he has done the same at churches round our region too. What we have found most helpful is that people serving on PA at smaller churches who do not necessarily have much experience, the chance to have firstly basic training, but then a person within their church to refer back to when they're unsure of things is most helpful. So in our church, it's me (not that i'm an expert, I just was put in charge of things, so picked it up a lot faster than the others) or the guy who did the training. People don't always remember things after one lesson, but it has to be reinforced by practical experience, which takes time :-) So perhaps it would be a good idea to try and find people across various regions of the country who'd be willing to serve in this manner on a regional basis as it then means help is closer to hand than Watford for someone based in eg. Plymouth.
Joe "One, two, three, here we go..." ... follow me on Twitter @JJBHargreaves
Sounds excellent! Would definately try and attend!
Hi all I have been looking at comments and emails i have recieved. I like the idea of looking to do locally based events enabling churches within a region to be able to network. If this were to happen it would be good to have some one from the area /church we use to be part of a central organisation team. Comments please

Anthony drummer, Sound tech, lighting tech, video tech, youth leader

That sounds like a good idea. I think you probably need to get in touch with the sound teams at the big churches in various regions who might have some sort of people who could do that, and would be willing to. We just don't have the personnel at our place... a bigger church might.
Joe "One, two, three, here we go..." ... follow me on Twitter @JJBHargreaves
We have run a sound/PA training day ourselves with external input from Wigwam which was very good but I would echo Irish Admirals comments that people dont always pick things up first time, also that changes to equipment or band configuration can be problematic for the less expereinced operators. I suppose that this means I would endorse the regional approach but would also recommend that it is an ongoing exercise rather than a series of one off events. We would want to send 6 - 10 people if this does come off. Using worship central as a platform seems right to me, we are all aiming for the same goal.
I agree, I think it would be great to have some kind of ongoing events where people can go and learn. I think it would be of benefit to many people and could cover topics that simply aren't taught in our Church.
I like the idea of this and do think it'd be a good resource - as others have pointed out though it'd probably need to be fairly big with lots of different churches involved to work properly! That said, can I suggest a few topics up front for the first day? - However good your mics are, if you've got 2 cheap boxes from 3 decades ago reproducing the sound then it ain't gonna sound good. More expensive mics are not the answer. Neither is a more expensive desk... - However good your mics, speakers, desk, sound engineer and everything techie wise are, if the band are playing out of tune and generally badly then it ain't gonna sound good. More expensive speakers are not the answer... - The EQ on a desk is there to be altered if necessary. What's the point of getting a really nice desk then forbidding any sound engineers to touch anything but the faders at the bottom?! And finally, my biggest pet hate that I nearly ALWAYS see in church installations: - Desk channel numbers should not be taped over with heaps of sticky labels and marked "flute", "banjo", "uillean pipes", or whatever other instruments were present when the desk was labelled. Otherwise, a month or so down the line when things have changed slightly, everyone's saying things like "oh the keyboard's in the flute channel and the violin's in the banjo channel and today your Uillean pipes are in the diggerido channel because the Uillean pipe channel had a hissy fit at the weekend"... Joking aside (though I'm serious about the above points!) I do think it'd be great if something like this could kick off on a bigger scale. I do think some things would be better done in smaller groups though - sound especially is a very hands on thing and the best way to get good at it is to practice, so hauling 1000 people into a hall that have never seen a sound desk before and giving them a lecture probably wouldn't do much. I ran a short seminar with ~10 people a year or so back just covering the very basics which seemed to work quite well - I came in with an overview of what I wanted to cover but to be honest the whole thing turned into a big question and answer session which wasn't bad in itself; the small number meant I could be pretty specific to what people wanted to know. Those that wanted to know the basics of the controls on a sound desk all got to cram round it and have a look / fiddle, and those that had more specific questions had a chat about them. Hopefully, everyone went away with something at the end...! On the other hand though for more experienced guys there's a lot more that can be achieved on a larger scale - the digital vs. analogue debate can be talked over for instance (which can always last a while) and you can generally have quite in depth discussions on a topic once you know it! All this without the risk of putting the person that first saw a sound desk yesterday off :-) Just a few thoughts there really - but yup I'd be behind the idea!
Guys, I think this is one of the most key things in church worship at the moment. Even if you have the most super expensive great gear, and the most shinny perfect sounding church, unless you know how to use it then it'll always be bad. Too many times i see churches where the guys trained to push that button to make it work. He has no idea what that button is or what it does, but he knows if he pushes it, it'll work. We need to include some fundamental basics in the training.. Church sound people need to be able to operate their churches sound desk, and know what they are doing Maybe we should look at modular solutions for the training.. For some people they won;t come as they feel it's beneath them, so we need to find a way to put some meet in.. I also think it's ok if the training costs money. We need to start putting a value on worship in our church. There are companies already offering Church Sound and video training, Maybe there are some partnership avenues there. It could be a great team building exercise for your church. Maybe there are 4 people who do sound in your church? well what if you got together and did some training or went on a course run by someone? I think it's sooooo important.. Church should sound good and it should be fun to mix sound and not a stress and hard work not knowing what you're doing, or expected to do.
Yes... With the training we did at our place, we took things through from first principles, so the guys understand what everything does (although they need a bit of reminding! it'll come with experience though). It now means they understand what to do and can do pretty good mixes. Had a couple of the newbies mixing for me last Sunday, and they did a pretty good job. The only thing I touched was my guitar, which is a pain to EQ sometimes. To be honest, the sort of training we had at our church will suit those who are doing PA at 4 out of 5 churches. It really was just nice and simple. Couple of 3 hour practical & teaching sessions after church where everyone had the chance to give things a go. Job done! Digital vs. analogue... pros and cons. Analogue, because it's cheap, easier to train people on, and it's just so simple. Digital because if you invest the time sorting out and saving setups for various band / speaker configurations, it saves a lot of time. However, your average punter, faced with a digital desk, won't know where to start. I'm pretty happy with an analogue desk, and I wouldn't be confident using a digital desk. Putting a value on worship is dangerous. However, simply placing a greater importance on valuing it will help.
Joe "One, two, three, here we go..." ... follow me on Twitter @JJBHargreaves